City from Below

Human Trafficking

Human trafficking occurs every day on a national and global level. This crime impacts not only women and girls, but also men and boys. Many refer to human trafficking as “the crime that hides in plain sight.” Why? The signs are right in front of us, but many have not been trained to recognize them. 

“Trauma imposed by traffickers can be so great that many may not identify themselves as victims or ask for help"

Human trafficking involves the use of force, fraud, and coercion to exploit children and adults for labor and commercial sex acts against their will.

The crime can also involve:

  • Manipulation

  • Deception

  • Debt-bondage

City Sky

Traffickers target those they view as most vulnerable. Reasons one might be considered more susceptible include: 

  • Psychological or emotional stress

  • Economic hardship

  • Lack of a social safety net

  • Natural disaster exposure

Labor Trafficking

Sex Trafficking

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Urban Architecture

Labor trafficking is the use of force, fraud, or coercion to compel children and adults to work against their will in many different industries.

Sex trafficking is the use of force, fraud, or coercion to compel children and adults to engage in commercial sex acts against their will.

$150B+

industry

Human trafficking is a $150 billion global industry annually
(International Labour Organization, 2017).

40M+

victims

There is an estimated 40.3 million victims of human trafficking globally 

(International Labour Organization, 2017).

100K+

victims

There is an estimated 100,000 victims of human trafficking in the United States

(Federal Bureau of Investigation, 2016).

81%

forced labor

81% of victims are trapped in force labor

75%

female

75% of victims identify as female

25%

children

25% of victims are children

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Signs that someone may be a victim of human trafficking

Overly controlling partner

Visible signs of branding

Tense, fearful behavior

Unfit working conditions or hours

Overly controlling employer

If you suspect that someone you know is a victim of forced labor or commercial sexual exploitation, you can make a report (while remaining completely anonymous if preferred) by calling the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-373-7888. Be specific and give as many details as you can to be helpful. If someone is in immediate danger, call 911.